April 17, 2014

3D print tests and random doodles

Coffee break...
Hi there!

I never thought I'd enjoy being super busy with work and side projects. Everything I do is so random, which is perfect! This includes modeling for animation, designing concepts for a game, and helping an old classmate design part of his Asian sleeve. I don't know if I'm just really lucky this year, or things are turning up because I'm challenging myself more. In addition to all of this fun stuff, I'm 3D printing toys! Below are some print tests and anime-inspired doodles---a style I'll never get rid of no matter how much I try. =P


3D-Coat and Sketchbook Pro. A simple sketch and model to work with.

This is how they look before sanding. Tried two different software to test their support. One kept messing up her bangs, and the other uses more plastic but it does the job. (Thanks to Rich!)

After sanding and cleaning, knead together equal amount of resin and hardener, and apply enough to cover holes and fix imperfections. Press and scrape until filled and flattened, or sculpt the desired shapes, before they fully harden in minutes up to an hour or so.

There are some areas that I still need to sand, but I'm pretty satisfied with this so far. One of these days I'll try to use acetone vapor to make the print smoother for a more professional look. After all of this I can airbrush some primer on it and then paint with acrylics.

Some sketches I thought weren't difficult enough to print.

 I vaguely remember a fellow Academy student once said something like, "there are two types of people/artists in this world, those who watch anime and those who don't." I can totally relate because I was one of those 90s kids who LOVED Sailor Moon, Dragon Ball, Pokemon, etc., and continue to enjoy a lot of anime since then. They were dubbed in English so I didn't know what type of animation they were until high school, around the time a friend introduced me to manga! I used to spend most of my free time from college at a local Borders (the good ol' days when major bookstores were all over San Francisco) for several hours, at most 5-6 hours per visit, no joke. As an art student in the city, Borders was one of the best indoor places to fill a sketchbook. I would carefully draw random people without moving my head so much, because we all know getting caught can be soooo awkward. I wasn't a caffeine addict but being at Borders during warm days weren't complete without a tall iced coffee from some stores with Seattle's Best in a corner. After long days in school I would rush to the nearest bookstore (with my large drawing pad and all), grab several unsealed manga on my list with their new book smell, and flip through their pages in the opposite direction. I did support by buying books on Amazon, but sometimes I just couldn't wait for delivery every 2 weeks. Back then I would rather spend money on books than food. Sigh... good times.